Top Picks for 2018 and a Final Look at 2017 | Book Pulse

Looking Forward and Back

More “bests of 2017” slide into home plate even as 2018 picks pile up.

The Hollywood Reporter offers its “Best Comics of 2017.”

HuffPost picks “21 Of The Best Feminist Books of 2017” and lists 60 books they are looking forward to in 2018.

Bustle features 19 debut novels to look for in 2018.

Vogue has a list for early 2018.

Briefly Noted

Ron Charles of The Washington Post picks four books to help “understand your place in the cosmos,” including Magnitude: The Scale of the Universe by Megan Watzke and Kimberly Arcand (Black Dog & Leventhal: Hachette), writing that the authors and artist “explain the incomprehensible in delightfully comprehensible images and text.”

Michael Dirda reviews Wonders Will Never Cease by Robert Irwin (Arcade: Skyhorse), calling it an “ingenious historical fantasy” set during the War of the Roses.

Reporter Dan Zak reviews Hellfire Boys: The Birth of the U.S. Chemical Warfare Service and the Race for the World’s Deadliest Weapons by Theo Emery (Little, Brown: Hachette; LJ stars), saying “Here is a book that will burn your nostrils and make your throat close. Its main characters are asphyxiants and vesicants—mustard gas, chlorine and other chemicals deployed in World War I…it brims with shock and surprise.”

Staff writer Ian Shapira calls The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France’s Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando by Paul Kix (HarperLuxe) “thrilling … gripping … completely engrossing and elegantly told.” Vanity Fair has an interview with Kix.

The NYT reviews The Most Dangerous Man in America: Timothy Leary, Richard Nixon and the Hunt for the Fugitive King of LSD by Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis (Twelve: Hachette), calling it “a fun and exhausting recap of the LSD proselytizer Timothy Leary’s efforts to outrun Richard Nixon and the American law.” In other nonfiction coverage, the paper evaluates books on energy and nuclear war.

USA Today reviews The Man Who Made the Movies: The Meteoric Rise and Tragic Fall of William Fox (Harper), giving it “4 out of 4 stars” and reviews Ursula K. Le Guin’s No Time To Spare, which only gets three stars but is deemed “witty, often deeply observed.”

Vanity Fair looks at Eliot Ness’s classic memoir, The Untouchables.

Costco’s influential book buyer, Pennie Clark Ianniciello, picks We Were the Lucky Ones (Penguin), calling it “just the kind of story I love.”

LitHub is up to #21 in their literary news stories countdown, America authors infiltrating the Man Booker Prize.

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Neal Wyatt About Neal Wyatt

Neal Wyatt is LJ's reader's advisory columnist. She writes The Reader's Shelf, RA Crossroads, Book Pulse, and Wyatt's World columns. She is currently revising The Readers' Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2018). Contact her at


  1. Douglas Lord says:

    Book Pulse is a *great* idea – I can see this being an excellent help for collection development and ‘keeping up’ for busy librarians!

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