New Worlds to Explore | Genre Spotlight

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Judging by the upcoming fall publishing season, there will be plenty of speculative fiction titles to sharpen readers’ minds, but no one particular trend is leading the charge. Sf and fantasy has attracted a far more diverse readership than ever before, and publishing success can be found by exploring that diversity. Military sf and space opera stage a revival, fantasy goes dark, and digital publishing is here to stay.

Q&A: Sarah Peed

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As publishing evolves and writers turn to digital outlets to create and distribute new works, major publishers like Random House Publishing Group, a division of the newly formed Penguin Random House, have committed to finding these new authors and delivering exciting fresh content to today’s most tech-savvy readers. Sarah Peed is the associate editor at […]

YA Crossover Tops Inaugural LibraryReads List

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The inaugural LibraryReads lists ten titles (published this month and forthcoming) nominated as “favorites” by librarians from around the country.

Media NewsBriefs | August 2013

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The latest news from Findaway World and hoopla digital

Super Crips and Gay Dads: Avoiding Stereotypes in Video Collections | ALA 2013

An ALA program tackled issues of building a responsible film collection that portrays minority communities (native, black, queer, and disabled Americans) in responsible, respectful ways.

Alice Walker Wore Purple | ALA 2013

The World Will Follow Joy

Alice Walker wore purple.
It was not the last official day of the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Chicago, but the McCormick Center’s auditorium had a kind of concluding air about it. (Perhaps it was the number of librarians carting luggage up and down the halls.) Eva Poole, President of the Public Library Association (PLA), introduced Monday’s midmorning speaker. The audience settled into its seats.
When she arrived at the podium, she sighed. “I’m so glad to see you.”

Illusion and Empathy in Science Fiction | ALA 2013

“The mixing of factual and counterfactual is not singular to sci fi and fantasy,” Timothy Zahn (“Thrawn Trilogy”) began. Zahn and Brandon Sanderson (“Mistborn”), Cory Doctorow (Homeland), David Brin (“Uplift”), Elizabeth Bear (Shattered Pillars), and John Scalzi (“Old Man’s War”) were charged with talking about the probable and improbable in science fiction (and, to a certain extent, in fantasy too). Organized by the Library and Information Technology Association and with help from Tor, the Saturday, June 28 panel was packed.

“Whose Table?”: On Libraries and Race | ALA 2013

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Sunday morning’s “In Visibility: Race and Libraries” was a crash course in sociology and libraries, taught by Todd Homna, assistant professor of Asian American Studies at Pitzer College and a former ALA Spectrum Scholar. Sponsored by ALA’s Office for Diversity and the Spectrum Scholars Program, asked the question: “Where do we locate race in relation to librarianship?”

Readers’ Advisory Panels Look at Genre and Marketing | ALA 2013

Reference and User Services Association (RUSA)-sponsored panel, “Beyond Genre: Exploring the Perception, Uses, and Misuses of Genre by Readers, Writers, and Librarians” attracts a large crowd, eager for discussion.

The Library Is Open: A Look at Librarians and Tumblr

The Library Is Open

What makes library Tumblrs different from your run-of-the-mill library blogs is that they can take advantage of a built-in community with built-in readers. If a Wordpress or Blogspot blog is an island, Tumblr blogs are a city. Many librarians were initially attracted to Tumblr for the same reasons nonlibrarians were—ease of use, social features, the cool factor. But, once they arrived, they began to run into each other, then to talk to with one another, and finally to understand themselves as a community. The portmanteau Tumblarians—meaning “Tumblr librarians”—was coined and a subculture born.

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