Following the Digital Clues: Mystery Genre Spotlight

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The world of mystery is ever-popular and ever-evolving. Whether a classic “whodunit,” a cozy, a police procedural, or something in between, crime fiction still draws readers nationwide. In a brief survey of 232 public libraries conducted by LJ, 55% of respondents reported that mystery continues to be the most popular genre in terms of circulation. The survey also found that in print fiction collections, 24.1% of materials are mysteries.

What is new this year is that mystery titles make up over 20% of library ebook collections. And like their print counterparts, the highest circulating subgenres in mystery ebooks are police procedurals and cozies. However, 57% of the survey respondents do not purchase e-original mysteries (perhaps owing to a lack of review coverage and issues of discovery?); chief e-mystery purchase influencers are high-demand titles, user requests, and cost.

Crime Fiction Reviews | March 15, 2013

Reviews of Jussi Adler-Olsen’s A Conspiracy of Faith, Cara Black’s Murder Below Montparnasse, Jane Casey’s The Last Girl, and Thomas Perry’s The Boyfriend.

Scottish Crime Fiction

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Reviews of Stuart MacBride’s Birthdays for the Dead and Denise Mina’s Gods and Beasts.

Xpress Reviews: Fiction | First Look at New Books, November 30, 2012

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Greatshell’s latest lassos the horror in the supernatural as mystical cults battle it out on a Catalina Island. Hanne Wilhelmsen hunts for a serial killer, while battling her inner demons. James delivers another masterpiece involving Austen and a “missing text.” Full disclosure in Ochse’s new military adventure, where secret commandos clash with supernatural threats, reflecting the all too real-life of SEAL Team Six.

Iain Banks Doubleheader | October 15, 2012

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Reviews of Iain Banks’s Stonemouth and The Hydrogen Sonata from the Oct. 15 issue.

Mystery Reviews | October 1, 2012

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Reviews of Harry Bingham’s Talking to the Dead, Brian Wiprud’s The Clause, and Lene Kaaberbol and Agnete Friis’s Invisible Murder, plus a full list of mystery review from the Oct. 1 issue.

Prior Misconduct: Historical True Crime | Collection Development

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While abhorrent to some, the appeal of historical true crime is not so difficult to imagine: vivid eras are brought to life in these accounts, many of which are assiduously researched, footnoted, and indexed. Furthermore, the story lines offer readers many compensations—the satisfaction of the compulsion to face the worst in human nature; the assurance that justice has been done; and, certainly not least, the chance to empathize with and offer witness to the victims in their hours of need.

We Have Winners!: Mystery’s Highest Honors Awarded

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We Have Winners!: Mystery’s Highest Honors Awarded

Wyatt’s World: Blooming Crime Novels

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Wyatt’s World: Blooming Crime Novels

Mystery Series Lineup, March 1, 2012

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Mystery Series Lineup, March 1, 2012