The Library as Safe Place | Behind the Book, February 15, 2017

When I was growing up in Washington, DC, the library was my safe place. I went two or three times a week after school and stayed until my working mother could retrieve me….So it is probably no surprise that my local library became the “safe place” where I wrote my latest book The Women in the Castle, a historical novel that took me over seven years to finish.

Q&A: Sana Krasikov | Debut Spotlight, February 15, 2017

Debut novelist Sana Krasikov shares insights into her inspiration for The Patriots, the current political climate, and her penchant for index cards.

Q&A: M. Simone Boyd & Onnie I. Kirk Jr.

The Day Sonny Died, coauthored by daughter/father writing team M. Simone Boyd and ­Onnie I. Kirk Jr., is a gritty, poignant, and realistic debut novel about three generations of an African American family struck repeatedly by violent tragedy.

Q&A: RESIST! Cartoonists Respond to the Election

After Election Day, November 8, 2016, Gabe Fowler had to do something. As owner of Brooklyn’s Desert Island comics shop and editor of the quarterly comics tabloid Smoke Signal, he decided to devote a special issue of that publication to cartoonists reacting against the forces of intolerance.

Erika Imranyi, Park Row: Harlequin | Eye on Publishing

Park Row thus seemed the perfect name for the new literary imprint Harlequin announced in July 2016, with the first titles publishing in early summer 2017. The imprint, explains editorial director Erika Imranyi, springs from the rich Harlequin tradition of publishing engaging commercial fiction while showing how successfully the publisher has pushed beyond those borders.

Reading Carrie Fisher | In the Bookroom

To celebrate Fisher as a writer, I have gone back into Library Journal‘s Book Verdict vault and pulled up our reviews of her novels and memoirs. For librarians, these would make a nice display counterpoint to DVDs of the actress’s films and stage performances.

Spotlight | Katherine Arden, LibraryReads Author, January 2017

Rooted in Russian history and folklore and told in language as extravagantly beautiful as the fire bird itself, Katherine Arden’s The Bear and the Nightingale brings us Vasilisa Petrovna, a village girl with royal bloodlines and more mysterious, magical antecedents who saves her corner of medieval Russia and effectively all humankind.

Books to Screen: Maria Semple’s “Today Will Be Different”

Academy Award winner Julia Roberts is set to star in the TV adaptation of Maria Semple’s sophomore novel

So You Think You Want To Review? Expert Advice from a Seasoned Editor

Henrietta Verma discusses her new book, offering advice for librarians on writing, reviewing, and leadership

Alice Hoffman | Spotlight LibraryReads Author, November 15, 2016

“This novel comes from lots of different places,” explained Hoffman in a phone interview with LJ, “but one thing I was thinking about was mothers and daughters, and I was missing my own mother.”