Q&A: Scott Hawkins | Debut Spotlight, October 15, 2015

©Scott Hawkins

An enticing and horrifying mashup of urban fantasy and mythology, Scott Hawkins’s debut novel, The Library at Mount Char, is sure to please adults and older teens looking for a harder edge and larger scale.

The Mountain Shadow by Gregory David Roberts | LJ Review


Gregory David Roberts’s long-awaited sequel to his best-selling Shantaram is bound to be as big a hit as its predecessor.

Reading in Translation | Wyatt’s World


Different rhythms, fresh stories, and landscapes unfamiliar fill the pages of translated novels. Here are five of fall’s buzziest, or simply most startling, picks, offering a diversity of sounds, approaches, and characters.

What’s in Santa’s Book Bag? Twenty-six Christmas Titles To Get Readers in a Festive Mood


This Yuletide season brings a sleigh full of Christmas cozies, from Elizabethan England to present-day Nantucket, MA, tempered by a few darker mysteries courtesy of Ann Cleeves and L.J. Oliver.

Jill Bialosky’s The Prize: An Investigation into the True Value of Art


For her novel, The Prize, Bialosky wanted to escape the realities of her daily life to focus on the key idea: the intersection of art and commerce.

LJ Fiction Reviews: October 1, 2015


Stars for Graves’s erotic romance, Tainted Heart, King’s stellar collection of short fiction, Bazaar of Bad Dreams, Baugh’s Mystery Pick of the Month, Quicksand, and more.

Fiction from Eskens, Farnsworth, Leigh, Scottoline, Toyne, and Valente | Xpress Reviews


Fans of Harry Bosch will eat up Eskens’s latest, Farnsworth’s blend of historical fiction and cutting-edge science adventure, a compelling historical series opener from Leigh, Scottoline won’t disappoint, Toyne turns in a subtle thriller, Valente is a major voice in modern sf and fantasy

Haunting Halloween Debuts | The Reader’s Shelf, October 1, 2015


Looking for some new voices in horror to suggest to patrons this Halloween? Here are six satisfyingly scary recent debuts that showcase the vibrant state of today’s horror.

Espionage: In From the Cold | Collection Development: Spy Fiction & More, October 1, 2015


Spy fiction is alive and well, despite the loss of its favorite setting—the Berlin Wall—and the demise of its chief nemesis—the Soviet Union. Warm up your collection with these 18 titles.

Fiction from Arlidge and Cullen, and Debuter Critchley | Xpress Reviews


Arlidge delivers on the promise of the first Helen Grace thriller with Pop Goes the Weasel; Critchley’s debut is utterly readable, swiftly entertaining, and at moments blackly funny; fans of historical fiction and biographies will enjoy Cullen’s novel about Mark Twain