Fiction from Blauner, Chamberlin, Hamilton, Herron, London, Nakamura, Shaara, Swinson, More | Xpress Reviews

Blauner’s first novel in more than ten years was worth the wait; Daily’s debut is good for those looking for a fluffy, fun summer read; aficionados of Gregg Hurwitz will quickly become Hamilton fans; London’s third “Highland Grooms” title is enchanting; Nakamura is for those who like their fiction dark; Shaara offers much to enjoy; Swinson delivers a superb second series installment

Early Scares: Halfway to Halloween | The Reader’s Shelf

Short stories are alive and kicking when it comes to tales of terror. Here are some recent anthologies that will deliver just the right amount of chills and thrills.

A Cuban Book Trip: Reading Flourishes at the Havana Book Fair

The captivating country of Cuba has welcomed readers, authors, publishers, and librarians to the Havana International Book Fair since 1982. Organized by the Ministry of Culture and the Cuban Book Institute, this standout cultural extravaganza, which originated as part of a government campaign to boost literacy on the island, celebrated its 26th anniversary this past February with a family-oriented festival dedicated to the pleasures of reading under the motto, “To read is to grow.”

Leading Adults to YA Fiction | Readers’ Advisory

According to a 2012 Bowker study, “Understanding the Children’s Book Consumer in the Digital Age,” the majority of YA buyers, at 55 percent, are adult—and of those, 78 percent are buying for themselves.

Making Horror Less Scary | Readers’ Advisory

Welcome to the world of horror fiction, where monsters roam the streets, vampires attack at night, ghosts haunt every home, and mayhem is the norm.

RA Ready: A Beginner’s Guide to Genre Fiction | Readers’ Advisory

There are few things more satisfying for a librarian than uniting a reader with a great book (or two or ten). But many library staffers experience anxiety when asked to recommend titles in genres they don’t read themselves and with which they are unfamiliar.

Living on the Edge with Thrillers | Readers’ Advisory

Thriller literature tends to have a bad reputation, and it’s unclear why that stigma exists. The majority of best-selling books today fall into this genre, and the writing, layout, characters, and plot can be at least as complex as in other genre fiction.

Fiction from Beck, Freeman, Patrick, Peterson, Weir, and First-Timer Konig | Xpress Reviews

Beck keeps the pages turning with plenty of suspense; fans of Freeman’s series should enjoy this fast-paced new addition; for readers who were horse-crazy girls; novels about second chances abound, but Patrick’s second novel rises to the top; Peterson’s book has a bit of an identity crisis; a well-written novel that should appeal to fans of Tudor-era fiction

LJ Fiction Reviews: May 1, 2017

Creech’s vividly descriptive and candid narrative gifts readers a timeless tale; gentle humor and evocative prose illuminate these characters’ need for a Refuge; Elsberg sucks readers into a mind-boggling, all too scary world; Goldberg’s Sherlock Holmes pastiche is pitch-perfect; a suspenseful, original, and confident debut to please fans of the hard-boiled PI genre

LJ Talks to First Novelist Benjamin Ludwig

Ginny Moon is debut novelist Benjamin Ludwig’s beautifully told story of a 14-year-old autistic girl, whose troubled past threatens her loving family’s fierce determination to keep her safe.