Readers’ Advisory Panels Look at Genre and Marketing | ALA 2013

Reference and User Services Association (RUSA)-sponsored panel, “Beyond Genre: Exploring the Perception, Uses, and Misuses of Genre by Readers, Writers, and Librarians” attracts a large crowd, eager for discussion.

The Library Is Open: A Look at Librarians and Tumblr

The Library Is Open

What makes library Tumblrs different from your run-of-the-mill library blogs is that they can take advantage of a built-in community with built-in readers. If a Wordpress or Blogspot blog is an island, Tumblr blogs are a city. Many librarians were initially attracted to Tumblr for the same reasons nonlibrarians were—ease of use, social features, the cool factor. But, once they arrived, they began to run into each other, then to talk to with one another, and finally to understand themselves as a community. The portmanteau Tumblarians—meaning “Tumblr librarians”—was coined and a subculture born.

White Girls and Dead Dogs | What We’re Reading

White Girls

This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staff are reading zombie recipes, advice columns, romance novels, essay collections, memoir, and some literary fiction here and there. Who says we aren’t an eclectic bunch?

Gender Struggles | What We’re Reading

Vonnegut

This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffer reads involve struggling with gender stereotypes in fantasy books, computer games, and 19th-century England. In other news, LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro is reading Vonnegut’s last book of essays, and I have yet not kicked my audiobook habit. Kate DiGirolomo, Editorial Assistant, LJ I’ve started The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Real […]

Murderous Monologs, Dying Suns, and a Library Deluge | What We’re Reading

Sword of the Lictor

This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffers are getting cozy with  tales of murder and with children’s literature. SLJ‘s Shelley Diaz and Chelsey Philpot are both reading Bennett Madison’s September Girls (HarperCollins) and I’m listening to an audiobook full of crunchy, creaky words: armiger, chiliarch, cacogen, exultant, optimate, destrier, undine. If you see me murmuring to myself on the […]

Getting Reacquainted with Fiction | Library Journal’s Day of Dialog

DoD

Library Journal’s 2013 Day of Dialog ended with a table lined with familiar faces: Amy Tan, with her first novel for adults since 2005′s Saving Fish from Drowning; Richard North Patterson, with a work narrated by a 22-year-old woman; Allan Gurganus, with his first book in 16 years; prolific critic Caleb Crain, with his first ever novel (though second book); Al Lamanda, with Sunrise (Gale Cengage, Aug.), the follow up to his Edgar-nominated Sunset; and of course Library Journal‘s own Barbara Hoffert as moderator.

Magazines, Essays, and Some Romance | What We’re Reading

Evil and the Mask

This past week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffers went to BEA, and we are still feeling its throws. Guy and myself are going without books for a time, and Bette-Lee got her hands on a new book that will make her fellow romance fans green with envy.

Tear Jerkers, Literary Thrillers, and a Love Song to Video Games | What We’re Reading

Rose

This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffers are reading lots of hot forthcoming books: Elizabeth Wein’s follow-up to Code Name Verity, Marisha Pessl’s noiry Night Film. I’m most intrigued by a novel my colleague Meredith Schwartz just finished, Austin Grossman’s You, which she promises is like (at least a little bit) many of my own favorite books.

Happy Birthday Kierkegaard | Classic Returns

Speedboat

This month, two underappreciated women novelists return to print, a philosopher turns 200, Manning Marable’s tremendous new resource for Malcolm X scholars is published posthumously, and trans activist Kate Bornstein updates her Gender Workbook for the 21st century.

Time Will Tell: Librarians on Yahoo’s Acquisition of Tumblr

via

Perhaps what’s most noteworthy about the Tumblr library community’s reaction to the blogging service’s purchase by web behemoth (and, well, dinosaur) Yahoo is the lack of one. Yahoo, which announced the deal on its own Tumblr blog with a kind-of-awkward gif, purchased Tumblr for $1.1 billion and promised “not to screw it up.” When asked […]

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