The Business & Pleasure of Comics | Wyatt’s World

Comics offer readers many pleasures—of story, of image, and of details brought forth through the combination of both media. The richness of experiences possible are explored in these five new releases. From historical accounts to trippy flights of imagination, these titles well illustrate the great range of the form.

  • Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks (text) & genesis032814 The Business & Pleasure of Comics | Wyatts WorldCaanan White (illus.) (Broadway: Crown).
    Fluid, bold, and ferocious black-and-white illustrations immerse readers in Brooks’s heroic and indignant account of the 369th Infantry regiment of World War I, composed of African American men who faced great discrimination even as they heroically fought for a country that disdained them.
  • Genesis by Nathan Edmondson (text) & Alison Sampson & Jason Wordie (illus.) (Image).
    Edmondson’s odd, twisty, and hallucinogenic exploration of creativity and creation tells the story of Adam, who can create his world anew. Sampson’s captivating art consists of fragile lines and vivid images that reward study.
  • How About Never—Is Never Good for You? My Life in Cartoons by Bob Mankoff (text & illus.) (Holt).
    Both cartoonist for The New Yorker as well as its cartoon editor, Mankoff delivers a memoir of his childhood and his work for the magazine, sharing insights into the great comics that fill its pages, what makes them work, and what makes them funny—all copiously illustrated with comics, of course.
  • Nemo: The Roses of Berlin by Alan Moore (text) & Kevin O’Neill (illus.) (Top Shelf).
    In this follow-up to Nemo: Heart of Ice, Captain Nemo’s daughter, Janni, ventures into the depraved heart of 1941 Berlin to rescue her loved ones. Expect great fun and sly allusions from Moore in his trademark mashup style as well as detailed and clever art from O’Neill.
  • Amazing Spider-Man: Family Business by Mark Waid & James Robinson (text) & Gabriele Dell’Otto (illus.) (Marvel).
    Spider-Man might have a sister, but that is not the only excitement here—splendor is also to be had in the writing team of Waid and Robinson combined with the gloriously expressive and perspective-shifting art of Dell’Otto.
Share
Neal Wyatt About Neal Wyatt

Neal Wyatt compiles LJ's online feature Wyatt's World and is the author of The Readers' Advisory Guide to Nonfiction (ALA Editions, 2007). She is a collection development and readers' advisory librarian from Virginia. Those interested in contributing to The Reader's Shelf should contact her directly at Readers_Shelf@comcast.net

Comment Policy:
  1. Be respectful, and do not attack the author or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  2. Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  3. Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through (though some comments with links to multiple URLs are held for spam-check moderation by the system). If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

We accept clean XHTML in comments, but don't overdo it and please limit the number of links submitted in your comment. For more info, see the full Terms of Use.

Speak Your Mind

*

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin