In a Room of Their Own: Reading Women’s History Month | Wyatt’s World

Mark this month, dedicated to the creations of women, by celebrating authors who have claimed the space asked for in Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own. From debut offerings to new works by some of the best writers of our age, here are five noteworthy titles.

the enchanted03714 In a Room of Their Own: Reading Women’s History Month | Wyatts World

  • The Enchanted by Rene Denfeld (Harper).
    Denfeld’s darkly dramatic yet crystalline first novel takes readers into a prison where magical realism lessens the crushing burden of incarceration and “the lady” fights to save an inmate from a death sentence.
  • The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman (Scribner).
    Hoffman’s lushly set and richly detailed work transports readers to New York City in the era of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire (1911) and into a story steeped in intrigue and romance.
  • Bark by Lorrie Moore (Knopf).
    One of our preeminent writers of short-form fiction, Moore presents a collection of eight stories that are sly and funny, beautifully wrought, and finely observant.
  • The Wives of Los Alamos by TaraShea Nesbit (Bloomsbury).
    This innovatively written and well-achieved debut traces the lives of a number of women who relocate with their husbands to New Mexico during World War II to the site of one of the atomic bomb projects.
  • Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi (Riverhead).
    The tale of Snow White borrowed and reimagined in astounding style, Oyeyemi’s novel turns the “mirror on the wall” around and forges a brilliant examination of race, beauty, and perception.
Share
Neal Wyatt About Neal Wyatt

Neal Wyatt compiles LJ's online feature Wyatt's World and is the author of The Readers' Advisory Guide to Nonfiction (ALA Editions, 2007). She is a collection development and readers' advisory librarian from Virginia. Those interested in contributing to The Reader's Shelf should contact her directly at Readers_Shelf@comcast.net

Comment Policy:
  1. Be respectful, and do not attack the author or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  2. Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  3. Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through (though some comments with links to multiple URLs are held for spam-check moderation by the system). If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

We accept clean XHTML in comments, but don't overdo it and please limit the number of links submitted in your comment. For more info, see the full Terms of Use.

Speak Your Mind

*

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin