Veronica Mars | Pop Culture Advisory

Last week, the Kickstartered Veronica Mars movie came out in a limited theatrical release as well as being available simultaneously on Video On Demand. It may have slaked fans’ thirst for the escapades of a wisecracking, whip-smart female sleuth and her star-crossed lover(s?) for a little while, but they’ll be looking for more content in that vein before long.

For more of Veronica herself, Rob Thomas and Jennifer Graham’s novel Veronica Mars: The Thousand-Dollar Tan Line allows readers to check in with her after the events that transpire in the movie. She’s back in Neptune, back to PI work, and looking for a missing person who may have connections to organized crime.

For another teen crime story with noir conventions, take a look at the critically acclaimed, film Brick starring Joseph Gordon-Leavitt, or the lesser-known Assassination of a High School President which, despite big-name stars Bruce Willis and Mischa Barton, went straight to DVD after the bankruptcy of its distributor.

For outsider teen sleuth stories:
Kathleen Hale’s No One Else Can Have You features Kippy Bushman, a genuinely eccentric Wisconsonite who, like season one Veronica, is trying to identify her best friend’s killer.

In Michele Jaffe’s Ghost Flower, runaway Eve is hired by two wealthy teens who want to take advantage of her uncanny resemblance to their late cousin Aurora to get their hands on her inheritance. But the more she’s involved with them, the more curious Eve becomes about what really happened to Aurora.

Out last year in the UK, the first volume in Jane Casey’s Jess Tennant series, How To Fall, will release in the States in August. Jess spends the summer in her mother’s hometown a year after her cousin Freya died mysteriously. Was it an accident? Suicide? Murder? Jess is going to find out.

The relationship between sheriff turned private investigator Keith Mars and his daughter is one of the great things about the show. Harlan Coben’s Mickey Bolitar series plays with that dynamic, as PI Myron Bolitar, the main character of Coben’s 10-book series for adults (the most recent installment is Live Wire) takes in his nephew, Mickey, after the boy’s father dies and his mother goes into rehab. Shelter launches the series: the teen is settling in as well as can be expected until his new girlfriend disappears and he sets out to find her.

Despite its paranormal elements, Buffy the Vampire Slayer was probably the closest thing on television to Veronica Mars—a spunky, tiny blonde with a few close friends susses out danger and sets things to rights while throwing around sharp, sparkling dialog. Sounds vaguely familiar…

Veronica’s ten-year reunion plays a large part in the film, so these films about reunions may resonate with fans. Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion sees two best friends (Lisa Kudrow and Mira Sorvino) trying to pass themselves off as more successful than they are, with predictable (and hilarious) results, while Grosse Point Blank has a plot that could be an episode of Veronica Mars—John Cusack needs to stop an assassin from killing his high school girlfriend’s father the weekend of their reunion—except that Cusack is a hit man himself.

Of course, the show’s cast had plenty of projects between the end of the show and the movie. Fans can see many of them at once in show creator Rob Thomas’s follow-up project Party Down, which followed the wait staff at a Los Angeles catering company. The short-lived but much beloved show starred Adam “Mr. Rooks” Scott and Lizzie Caplan and featured Kristen “Veronica Mars” Bell, Ken “Vinnie Van Lowe” Marino, Ryan “Dick Casablancas” Hansen, Enrico “Keith Mars” Colantoni, Martin “Stu Cobbler” Starr, and Jason “Logan Echolls” Dohring, among others. Tina “Mac MacKenzie” Majorino had arcs on television shows such as Bones, True Blood, Grey’s Anatomy, and Big Love. Amanda “Lilly Kane” Seyfried appeared on the latter as well, in addition to a burgeoning film career with credits including Les Misérables, Lovelace, and Mamma Mia.

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Stephanie Klose About Stephanie Klose

Stephanie Klose (sklose@mediasourceinc.com, @sklose on Twitter) is Media Editor, Library Journal.

Comments

  1. I remember the Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz filled a bit of the hole left in the wake of Veronica Mars cancelation. It also reminded me a bit of Harriet the Spy which is definitely a good thing.

  2. Jim E says:

    How could you not list Enrico “Keith Mars” Colantoni’s five season run on the Canadian TV series “Flashpoint” as Sgt. Greg Parker, leader of “Team One”? This was one of the best police special unit shows ever produced?

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