The Author as Narrator | Wyatt’s World

No one knows just how a sentence should be paced, an inflection stressed, or a word uttered better than the author. Yet not all writers are the best narrators of their own work. Here are five authors who create as equally wonderful work in the ear as on the page.

At Home: A Short History of Private Life. written and at home0627 The Author as Narrator | Wyatts Worldnarrated by Bill Bryson (Recorded Bks.). Humor and a lovely sense of fun mark Bryson’s reading of this riff on ordinary things connected to a house—from locusts to furniture. The wit and attention to detail in Bryson’s prose equally match his narration, which is quickly paced, perfectly inflected, and endlessly engaging.

In the Body of the World. written and narrated by Eve Ensler (Macmillan Audio). In a raw, poetic, and brash reading, Ensler matches her forceful, clarion writing with a powerful performance that recollects her early life working with women in the Congo and her battle with uterine cancer. This engrossing, all-consuming experience sweeps listeners into a world of hurt, outrage, passion, and hope.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane. written and narrated by Neil Gaiman (Harper Audio). To overstate how grand Gaiman is at reading his work is nearly impossible—he paces his lines perfectly and infuses each with lush tonal qualities that are constantly delightful. Here he takes listeners back in time as an unnamed adult remembers a terrible, magical, astounding event from his childhood.

A Delicate Truth. written and narrated by John le Carré (Recorded Bks.). Le Carré is a fine reader of his own work, offering listeners dry, nuanced, and superbly paced aural experiences. His fluid reading matches this tightly constructed story that starts with a counterterrorist operation gone wrong and brilliantly spins into a tense spiral of personal responsibility and institutional power.

Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim. written and narrated by David Sedaris (Hachette Audio). Sedaris’s work, as funny as it is in print, is even better in audio. His sly, drawling voice, perfect sense of timing, and deadpan delivery combine to create a listening experience that is hysterical…and actually painful to hear. At least while reading the print you can stop to laugh. Here you’ll hit the pause button—over and over.

Share
Neal Wyatt About Neal Wyatt

Neal Wyatt compiles LJ's online feature Wyatt's World and is the author of The Readers' Advisory Guide to Nonfiction (ALA Editions, 2007). She is a collection development and readers' advisory librarian from Virginia. Those interested in contributing to The Reader's Shelf should contact her directly at Readers_Shelf@comcast.net

Comment Policy:
  1. Be respectful, and do not attack the author or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  2. Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  3. Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through (though some comments with links to multiple URLs are held for spam-check moderation by the system). If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

We accept clean XHTML in comments, but don't overdo it and please limit the number of links submitted in your comment. For more info, see the full Terms of Use.

Speak Your Mind

*

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin