Best Books 2011: Business

ljx111201webBBbusiness2 Best Books 2011: Business

Selected by Sarah Statz Cords, The Reader’s Advisor Online

Banerjee, Abhijit V. & Esther Duflo. Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way To Fight Global Poverty. PublicAffairs: Perseus. ISBN 9781586487980. $26.99.
Economics professors Banerjee and Duflo reveal that those living in poverty often act according to their preferences and habits much like others would, necessitating more complex answers to their lives’ challenges than previously offered.

Cohan, William. Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came To Rule the World. Doubleday. ISBN 9780385523844. $30.50.
The journalist most quoted for his criticisms of Goldman Sachs’s daring (some would say greedy) and connected (some would say insider) trading is Matt Taibbi. Financial journalist Cohan provides a somewhat more level-headed consideration of the firm.

Cortese, Amy. Locavesting: The Revolution in Local Investing and How To Profit from It. Wiley. ISBN 9780470911389. $22.95.
Investors stymied by current market conditions may be ready to consider Cortese’s treatise on the art of supporting local and small businesses. Although many of her examples are in the early stages of development, she provides ample ideas for new consumption and investment opportunities. (LJ 6/15/11)

Dicker, Dan. Oil’s Endless Bid: Taming the Unreliable Price of Oil To Secure Our Economy.Wiley. ISBN 9780470915622. $34.95.
Energy analyst Dicker argues that oil’s price volatility is largely attributable to investors and governments treating it like an investment rather than a commodity. More succinct and personal than Daniel Yergin’s The Quest.

Kawasaki, Guy. Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions. Portfolio. ISBN 9781591843795. $26.95.
Kawasaki’s name is ubiquitous in business publishing. While his latest title doesn’t break much new ground, it is, for lack of a better word, enchanting, with rapid-fire suggestions for beguiling customers and competitors.

Klososky, Scott. The Velocity Manifesto: Harnessing Technology, Vision, and Culture To Future-Proof Your Organization. Greenleaf. ISBN 9781608320851. $24.95.
Tech company start-up guru Klososky introduces readers to corporate technological infrastructure, aka digital plumbing. Arguing that innovations will continue to proliferate quickly, he lays out a blueprint for leaders to make the best use of current tools.

Levy, Steven. In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives. S. & S. ISBN 9781416596585. $26.
Levy’s comprehensive, if a bit starry-eyed, investigative work on Google’s founding, guiding principles, and innovations achieves a balance not found in Douglas Edwards’s I’m Feeling Lucky and Siva Vaidhyanathan’s The Googlization of Everything.

O’Shea, James. The Deal from Hell: How Moguls and Wall Street Plundered Great American Newspapers.PublicAffairs: Perseus. ISBN 9781586487911. $28.99.
O’Shea’s story-driven insider’s exposé neatly combines a recent history of journalism and print publications’ travails with an incisive look at the financial wheeling and dealing that hastened the decline of newspapers. (LJ Xpress Reviews, 6/17/11)

Rumelt, Richard P. Good Strategy, Bad Strategy: The Difference and Why It Matters. Crown Business. ISBN 9780307886231. $28.
Management consultant Rumelt offers a refreshingly forthright take on what makes bad strategy bad, why there is so much of it out there, and how to formulate good strategy that is unexpected, coherent, and effective. (LJ 7/11)

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